MAKE AN EARLY START FOR HEALTHY TEETH

While research over recent years has revealed that the health of children’s teeth has improved, it’s still true that five year olds in the UK rank only seventh in Europe for dental health, and children from disadvantaged backgrounds are 50% more likely to have tooth decay.
So learning about how to keep teeth healthy from an early age is still important, and your dentist or hygientist at the Chattering Class Clinic are always on hand to advise on how to take care of your children’s teeth to prevent decay.
Brush your child’s teeth twice a day, once just before bedtime and at least one other time during the day. Supervise tooth brushing until your child is seven or eight years old, either by brushing their teeth yourself or, if they brush their own teeth, by watching how they do it.
With a tooth-brushing routine established at home, bring your child with you when you visit the Chattering Class Clinic, so they become familiar with the environment and get to know the dentist, who can identify any problems at an early stage.

Some tips for healthy young teeth include to start brushing your baby’s teeth with fluoride toothpaste as soon as the first milk tooth breaks through – usually at around six months, but it can be earlier or later.
Children under the age of three can use a smear of family toothpaste containing at least 1,000ppm (parts per million) fluoride, and between the ages of three and six they can use a small blob of toothpaste containing 1,350-1,500ppm fluoride.

Just opening up their mouths for the chelsea dentist to take a look is useful practice for the first time they need treatment, and will help to make a visit to the dentist as routine as it is for you.

NEW SENSOR COULD ADD TO THE FLUORIDE DEBATE

An age-old debate could be renewed after news that a Florida State University researcher has developed a molecular sensor that changes colour when a sample containing fluoride is added to it.
The device, for which a patent has been applied, is said to detect about one ten-thousandth of a milligram of fluoride in a litre of water, making it one of the most sensitive fluoride sensors developed to date.
Fluoride is a natural mineral that is found in many foods and in all drinking water, where the level varies from area to area. According to the British Dental Health Foundation it can greatly help dental health by strengthening tooth enamel, making it more resistant to decay, particularly among  children.
Where you live will determine whether or not your drinking water contains fluoride, but most toothpastes now contain fluoride, and many people get their fluoride this way.
Opponents of its use point to ‘dental fluorosis’, caused by having too much fluoride when the teeth are developing. This can happen when fluoride supplements are taken by children under 7 who live in areas where the water supply is fluoridated. It can also happen when children swallow toothpaste.
Many reports have been published throughout the world about the pros and cons of fluoride, but the Dental Foundation maintains: ” After many years the scientific conclusion is that fluoride toothpaste and correctly fluoridated water, salt and milk are of great benefit to dental health and help to reduce decay, and cause no harmful side effects to general health”.
For a professional view, feel free to consult your dentist at the Chattering Class Clinic, who will be pleased to advise on any topic concerning your dental health and that of your family.

HOW TO DEAL WITH A KNOCKED-OUT TOOTH

Experiencing the sort of accident when your child has fallen over and has knocked out one of their permanent front teeth is  a scenario that panics even the most calm parent, and  how to deal with the situation quickly and efficiently can make a huge difference to the outcome and the child’s appearance.
So this advice from the Chattering Class Clinic could be invaluable:
1. Comfort the child, and immediately try to find the tooth.
2. Do not scrub it, but clean any debris gently.
3. Ideally, rinse the tooth in the child’s saliva, or if you are the parent use your own saliva – but otherwise use milk.
4. If you can, place the tooth gently but with a little pressure into its socket, checking it’s the right way round – but don’t worry too much about the angle.
5. If you can’t put the tooth in place, keep it wet in saliva or milk – and get to a dentist as soon as possible.
6. Tell the dental practice you need to be seen immediately.
If you have any concerns about what to do in an emergency, or what day-to-day steps to take to care for your child’s teeth, your Chelsea dental team will always be pleased to talk to you on the telephone or live on-line.

MAKE TIME FOR THE CHILDREN TO BRUSH THEIR TEETH

Grabbing a piece of toast to eat on the way to work may be part of the stressful scenario in many households, but letting the children off brushing their teeth to save time in a busy lifestyle can only be counter productive.
A study among 1,002 parents with children aged between four and 10 carried out for Philips Sonicare “shows that many British parents are ignoring the warnings of dental professionals and letting their children off brushing their teeth“.
The parental sample were simply “too rushed or stressed” to ensure their youngsters used a toothbrush, says a report in the Dental Practice magazine.
Nearly a third said they allowed children to skip brushing their teeth if they were “in too much of a rush”, 20% allowed them to miss their morning brushing routine “to avoid the hassle”, and a quarter of those surveyed claimed constant arguing among children having to brush their teeth “caused anxiety”.
The survey found “18% admitted their child only brushes once a day, if at all”.
At the Chattering Class Clinic its standard practice to encourage parents to bring their children along from an early age, where they can meet the dental team in a friendly and relaxed setting – and even show how clever they are at brushing their own teeth.

MAKE AN EARLY START FOR HEALTHY TEETH

While research over recent years has revealed that the health of children’s teeth has improved, it’s still true that five year olds in the UK rank only seventh in Europe for dental health, and children from disadvantaged backgrounds are 50% more likely to have tooth decay.
So learning about how to keep teeth healthy from an early age is still important, and your private dentist in chelsea or hygienist at the Chattering Class Clinic is always on hand to advise on how to take care of your children’s teeth to prevent decay.
Some tips for healthy young teeth include starting brushing your baby’s teeth with fluoride toothpaste as soon as the first milk tooth breaks through – usually at around six months, but it can be earlier or later.
Children under the age of three can use a smear of family toothpaste containing at least 1,000ppm (parts per million) fluoride, and between the ages of three and six they can use a small blob of toothpaste containing 1,350-1,500ppm fluoride.
Brush your child’s teeth twice a day, once just before bedtime and at least one other time during the day. Supervise tooth brushing until your child is seven or eight years old, either by brushing their teeth yourself or, if they brush their own teeth, by watching how they do it.
With a tooth-brushing routine established at home, bring your child with you when you visit the Chattering Class Clinic, so they become familiar with the environment and get to know the dentist, who can identify any problems at an early stage.
 Just opening up their mouths for the dentist to take a look is useful practice for the first time they need treatment, and will help to make a visit to the dentist as routine as it is for you.